Neither Man Nor Machine – 2018 – Digital – click for full view on site!

Like some sort of horrifically deformed cyborg.

It’s definitely more man than machine, though. I decided to exclude the harness from the finished version, which will hopefully put more emphasis on the anatomy and (most importantly) the face as these were the key areas of the composition. It hasn’t been the easiest creature to paint, either. But that was part of the challenge. Even with the original incarnation I wasn’t too pleased with some areas of the composition, but I still feel as though this is an improvement. It also helps me ease into some of the paintings I have in mind.

I’ve had to learn a lot over the last few months.

It’s hard to explain, but I’ve mostly reworked my approaches to digital painting as the new tablet is so noticeably different that I can’t use my old habits. They just don’t work. That’s why I’ve focused so much on how this piece has progressed from the early concepts to later developments, because I’ve had to mostly relearn digital painting in the last six months.

I’m most pleased with the skin texture and how it seems to cracking, bubbling, and peeling from their flesh. I’m least pleased with the teeth. I could never really decide what I wanted to do with them, and I didn’t like them as much as the sketchy almost non-existent teeth in the original concepts. This is one of many things that I’ll need to work on in the coming months. I know my understanding of all of the digital tools is limited, as I lack experience, so I expect to have areas of different compositions which could have been handled better, but weren’t for one reason or another. It’s definitely one of my better attempts regardless of any criticisms I might have. But then I’ll always have criticisms of everything that I do.
That said, I am quite happy that the majority of my work of late has been finished. Not only do I learn more about digital approaches with each finished piece, but they provide much needed creative content that is quite varied at the moment. We’ve seen everything from owls, to fictional beasts, to the no longer deceased. I’ve been itching to do more traditional pieces recently, too. But I’ve still got two digital paintings which are on their way. One has been started (and was actually started before this piece) and the second is going to be started soon.

The second should be quite good should it ever see the light of day.

The one thing that I lack at the moment is time. Not in the sense that I don’t have enough of it, but in the sense that I have so many things that I’m working on that even with an overflowing amount of it there isn’t enough. I’m using every hour in the day that I can without pushing myself to exhaustion but it still isn’t enough. It’s an oddly enjoyable feeling, though.

I don’t think I could ever be upset about an increase in the amount of creative content I’m producing. It’s just that I’m quite tired at the moment. I’ve been falling back into the old habit of letting the schedule dictate the content rather than the content dictating the schedule. That said, I’ve been actively working against that recently. It’s just a shame that this piece went through so many different iterations before reaching its conclusion. I’ve spent a good number of hours on this piece by now. Definitely more than I should have spent. But the result is agreeable enough and so I can’t complain, but I do feel as though I could have finished two paintings in the time spent on this one. I guess I’m just overstimulated by recent motivation.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.

Doom, the UAC, Doomguy, Pinkies, Revenants, and all associated trademarks and devices are owned by id Software.

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Unholy Evolution

I wasn’t expecting to go on this journey.

Not that I mind. In fact, I’m actually quite fond of this piece because it has helped me illustrate (pun intended) some of my more ambitious digital approaches. It’s interesting looking back at how the piece has evolved from the earlier stages where it was more of a painting, to when it became an illustration of sorts, to how it has now become a hybrid of the two approaches. I’ve mentioned before that each of the newer digital paintings has their own unique qualities and this one (unsurprisingly) is no exception.

That’s a sentence that is quickly becoming redundant.

Mostly because I don’t think any piece will ever completely follow the one that came before it. I’m of the opinion at present that the thick painted style that’s starting to show through in this piece will make a return, but perhaps it will be more ambitious or more conceptual in that attempt. I’ll more than likely lean on this approach more as I think it has a lot of character.

I mentioned previously that I wasn’t sure how I’d use the layers for this piece. That’s always been an interesting point for me as I feel as though the layers are part of the digital approach, but I rarely use more than two or three. That said, I’ve also heard many experienced digital artists say that layers (and brushes) are individual to the person. There are no requirements to have multiple layers and you can use just the one if you prefer. I think that has always made more sense to me given my experience with traditional approaches. But, at the same time, it’s quite nice to be able to section up some areas of a piece to make it easier to add or edit them. Regarding this piece, it’s mostly painted on a single layer with a few extra layers for convenience.

I’m particularly reminded of raw chicken skin.

I’ve rather enjoyed writing these posts, too. It’s nice to have creative content that looks at how everything has changed. I’d felt that creative content had become stagnant, but through these work in progress (and the material studies) posts the newer content is more interesting as a result. It also gives me the opportunity to talk about things in a broader and less specific way. I can then easily tie this all together with an image or three, which makes it enticing even if you don’t care about what I’m actually saying in the post. Which I hope you do.

But even if you don’t it’s not like you can’t enjoy the pretty pictures all the same.

I’m particularly fond of the evolving colour choice in this piece. I’ve tried to include more darker colours to enhance the lighter ones, and to suggest a better sense of depth and contrast in the piece as a whole. I’m not sure if it actually worked but such is the way of painting anything. You can never be entirely sure of how a piece is going to develop until it has done so.

There’s also a whole section of this piece that I’ve yet to paint. It’s not a particularly large section, but the harness and mechanical components have yet to be added and will be used to frame the piece quite nicely. I don’t intend to paint much of the jet pack, either. But we’ll see how that goes when I get around to it. It shouldn’t be too much longer before we see the final version of this piece, though. The rather drastic change that occurred between this and the last work in progress shouldn’t occur again. But even if it does this will be the last post regarding this piece until the final version is presented, as I feel as though there is little left to say now. It’s definitely inspired more content than I could’ve anticipated.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.

Doom, the UAC, Doomguy, Pinkies, Revenants, and all associated trademarks and devices are owned by id Software.

Horrific Resurrection

I always knew this would come back.

Those who have followed me for a while may remember the original attempt I made when painting this particular hellish creation. I don’t necessarily dislike the original attempt, either. It’s just that I always knew that I could do something that better represented the way I originally envisaged the piece, that, due to various reasons, never actually materialised in the finished version. Not that it was ever completely finished. That said, I do like the conceptual approach I took with the original attempt.

It also serves to highlight my progress with digital painting.

Which is an approach I’m still fairly inexperienced with. Each of the attempts I’ve made at digital painting earlier this year have highlighted something unique to those pieces, and this piece is no exception. It also marks the first time that I’ve attempted something that is at the very least slightly humanoid. Which helps me to ease into prospective digital paintings.

I’ve had many different ideas for digital paintings this year, too. Most of them are considered purely to leverage the benefits of digital painting. In that, unlike traditional painting, you have the capability to infinitely reattempt a digital painting. You can be much more creative with the composition, colour choice, or approach as well. As there is little to no risk of actually being unable to finish the painting at a later date. This process can be quite costly with traditional approaches. It also allows me to get used to working on a piece consistently over multiple periods of time, which is something that I will need to become more accustomed to with traditional approaches in the future. I can’t quite say when these traditional pieces will make an appearance, though.

That’s the face I make when I get a free coffee.

This particular work in progress is going quite well at the moment. I’m most fond of the peeling skin texture, which is not unlike frayed fabric and fits how I envisaged the skin to be stretched over the flesh. I’m also quite fond of the eyes. They’re a little more squishy and bloodshot than I initially intended but they still fit. They haven’t fallen out of their eye sockets at least. I’m pleased with the semi-realistic approach as well. I’m not sure how best to actually describe this approach, but that’s to be expected at this point.

I never know what to call anything that I do.

I’m not entirely sure how I feel about the colour choice for the exposed flesh. It’s a little too bright for my tastes. But that could just be because I’ve been staring at this painting for hours and need a break from it. I’ll decide later whether I want to darken those colours, lighten them further, or leave them as they are. I don’t really know what I’m doing with the exposed flesh.

I’ve been much more concerned with the skin and the general composition up until this point. I wasn’t sure if I’d continue with my usual single layer approach, or if I’d use two layers with one for the skin and one for the flesh. Each approach is useful but I still feel more comfortable with the single layer. That said, I do have my usual extra layer which is used for the little details and additions which I might decide against later. Which, again, is another benefit prevalent in digital approaches. You can easily add new colours or details and (if desired) remove them just as easily. I’m still quite proud of how my creative efforts have developed over this year and I’m looking forward to what I might do next. Even I couldn’t say for certain.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.

Doom, the UAC, Doomguy, Pinkies, Revenants, and all associated trademarks and devices are owned by id Software.

Hunter’s Notes: Paolumu – 2018 – Digital – click for full view on site!

Even their ears are fluffy!

It just so happened that the brush which I made for specific areas of Older and Wiser became incredibly useful in detailing the fur on their balloon neck. I swear that’s just a coincidence and not some form of precognition. I wish it was some form of precognition. Knowing what’s going to happen in the future would be awesome. Except in all the scenarios where it wouldn’t be, because something bad will happen, but is required to happen, and so you would try to avoid it despite knowing it is unavoidable. That would just be unfortunate.

Fluffy But Terrifying offers insight as to my thoughts while painting this piece.

They’re mostly the same thoughts I have now that the piece is complete. As much as any piece is ever complete. One of the best (and most painful) things about growing as an artist is realising that you’ll never be where you want to be, because the goal keeps changing relative to your current perception of your level of skill. It’s a gnawing feeling that never goes away.

That said, I’m most disappointed with the fur on their balloon neck. Everything else is mostly where I want it to be. As noted in the aforementioned post regarding this piece, the thick painted approach is one that I’m unlikely to use for the next piece. It’s an interesting style but one that isn’t suited to everything. Hence these weird paintings that seem to spontaneously appear and disappear with equal amounts of haste. I’m looking to challenge myself. Which, to be fair, is the entire reason I enjoy my creative efforts in the first place. But there’s no point in always falling back on things I know (or at least feel fairly confident) that I can do. I like painting weird creatures, too. Once I find one it’s almost impossible to avoid painting it.
On the other hand, I’m much happier with my work and rate of progression at the moment. I’m much happier with everything in general. I changed around my personal life substantially since the end of last year, which has led to me doing more things that I like doing and enjoying those things much more than I used to. That’s definitely helped me bring out the best in my painting. The acquisition of the Wacom Intuos Pro has certainly helped, too. But that doesn’t mean I’m going to switch to only digital painting or illustrating.

Traditional pieces will still be likely to appear.

I’ve just got quite a few pieces that I’d like to revisit which I think I can make a better attempt at now. To Ink a Deathclaw comes to mind. That would be interesting both because the thick painted approach would likely suit it quite well, and it would be one of the few digital attempts that has line work. Or I might just get rid of the line work with the finished attempt.

I’m not entirely sure if I’ll paint other beasts in Monster Hunter World. Some are kind of messy with indistinguishable details and others don’t really appeal to me, but I won’t say it isn’t a possibility. I might tackle one of their dragons. Both literally (if I happen to purchase the PC release) and figuratively. I might just paint a dragon because I feel like painting one. In either case, I’m quite happy with this piece and I think it fits with what I want my creative efforts (and my personal site as a result) to be. I’m also quite happy that I’ve been working on all sorts of things recently and I’ve still found time to start three paintings and finish two of them. The third is a secret. A secret which might need to be approached in a different way for me to be happy with it.

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.

Monster Hunter World, Astera, Paolumu, Anjanath, and all associated trademarks and devices are owned by Capcom.

Fluffy But Terrifying

The cycle of fluffiness continues.

I’d also argue that the Paolumu is anything but terrifying. Quite adorable, in fact. But they are giant flying beasts that would more than likely swallow you whole if they got the chance… so maybe they are slightly terrifying. But, again, quite adorable, as their primary way to show aggression is to inflate their balloon neck. Which looks ridiculous and is not at all terrifying- unless you’re scared of balloons- in which case feel free to change your trousers at any time. I’m mostly fond of them due to their original design and their unique (and rather interesting) anatomy.

They’re also a great candidate to test my new brushes on.

I reckon you could make some rather nice brushes from their fur, too. In what could only be described as an entirely spontaneous decision I started to paint this majestic winged creature. I do that sometimes. In fact, some of my best work has been entirely spontaneous. Sometimes it’s nice to not stress every aspect of the painting and just focus on actually painting it.

I was also wondering how my new brushes would perform with a new piece. I’ve modified my existing set to include sharper, more precise, and more accurate brushes for those crisp lines. I’ve also added more texture to the flat brush I use often. I’m finding that these new brushes give me more freedom in some ways, more precision in others, and that they encourage more consistent blending. I’ve spent more time adjusting opacity with this piece, too. These are all things that are only possible due to my increasing confidence with digital approaches. I’m also no longer having to fight with the hardware, brushes, and canvas sizing to get the results I want. It’s about as close as I can get to mimicking traditional approaches but with digital tools.

Don’t make me puffy. You wouldn’t like me when I’m puffy.

I feel I’ve been bolder in my choice of colours for this piece. Not as bold as I’d like to be- but that will come with confidence. I’m also learning a lot about how best to approach layering colour and defining areas of an illustration or painting, which I could translate to traditional approaches. I’m quite excited to see how different my traditional work will be now. I don’t necessarily feel that either will get weaker as a result of focusing on one or the other. I feel as though they can only improve now. I just need to remember the limitations of each material.

I also miss ink. It allows me to add so many tiny (perhaps unnecessary) details.

I don’t know if this is an approach that I’ll continue to use in the future. I tend to think that each painting or illustration is unique, and, as such, requires a unique approach. I do want to have some consistency between pieces, though. Not having that consistency has caused me problems in the past. But I don’t know if this thick painted style is one I’d like to pursue for every piece.

I rather like how Older and Wiser has its own unique qualities and this piece is starting to develop its own unique qualities in kind. I’m also proud of the progress I’ve made in such a short time with digital painting. I’m far from where I would like to be, but, again, these things will come in time and with confidence. There’s no sense in rushing things. I also don’t know if the next piece you see from me will be the result of traditional or digital approaches. I’ve not felt this positive about my creative efforts in a long time. It’s refreshing- and exciting- and gives me hope for the future pieces I’ll produce. We may even see a few more from Monster Hunter World, too. They’ve got some incredibly colourful, meticulously designed, and anatomically interesting beasts.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.

Monster Hunter World, Astera, Paolumu, Anjanath, and all associated trademarks and devices are owned by Capcom.

Older and Wiser – 2017 – Digital – click for full view on site!

Something old that’s new again

If you’re curious as to the reasoning behind this piece (or potential creative content plans) feel free to check out Fluffy Beak. Most of the answers are there. What isn’t there is a long-winded explanation about how the right side of the face was ridiculously more complex than the left- as it was- and it was frustrating. I probably spent a good two hours painting over it. After which I was somewhat satisfied with the result. Mostly. No, no- it’s okay. Really. That said, as a first attempt with my newly acquired Wacom Intuos Pro I’m fairly happy with the result.

I’ll probably never be entirely happy.

But such is the joy of creating things. Or at least it is with my brain that never lets me acknowledge my accomplishments. I’m slightly easier on myself when it comes to digital painting and illustrating, though. I’m far less experienced with it (as I’ve only invested just over a year into it) compared to traditional approaches. Which I’m not always happy with, either.

I will admit that replacing my older Wacom Bamboo with a Wacom Intuos Pro has made an indescribable difference. I’m not usually one to highlight such things as I don’t believe that tools can ever or will ever replace experience, dedication, and practised skill. But there are some upgrades which make all the difference. This was one of them. Mostly because I wasn’t continually fighting with the tablet, having to work with an exceptionally larger than necessary canvas to accommodate a lack of pressure sensitivity, or working on such a small drawing surface so each stroke was much truer to life. I’m also exhibiting some of the aforementioned practised skill as I’ve become more accustomed with the ways to paint digitally.
On that note, this entire painting is comprised of two separate layers. One for the majority of the colour work and the other for minor details. I’d have preferred to do everything on a single layer, but it is quite convenient to have a layer dedicated to all those adorable fluffy lines and squiggles. I think the approach works quite well, too. While it’s also somewhat reminiscent of traditional painting as you usually work with only one surface and can only work it so many times. Even acrylic paint (or other opaque paints) have a limited number of layers.

Otherwise it becomes too warped to achieve the desired result.

I’ve also avoided an entirely realistic approach for this painting. I think that the semi-realistic somewhat stylised approach has a rather unique aesthetic. I don’t know if I’ll move towards more or less realistic results in the future, but for now these results fit well with my traditional approaches. I’m hoping to be more ambitious with my use of colour with future pieces, too.

I wasn’t really expecting such a positive result from this piece. I wasn’t really sure what to expect. But I’m glad that I’ve been able to better define some areas of my creative efforts and work towards things I actually enjoy doing. That even includes minor things like making custom brushes or organising supplies. Each and every thing I can do to make creating easier to approach, more convenient, or more enjoyable is worth doing. Working on this piece in shorter sessions also helped me work around the time that I sometimes don’t have to spare. It’s nice to know that I don’t need to compromise to continue to work on the things, but can also make progress and develop my approach at the same time. It’s a lot to juggle at once, though.

Have a nice week, all!

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.

Fluffy Beak

An unexpected development.

Once upon a time it was cows and now it’s owls. They’re everywhere. This particular owl is a reinterpretation of a piece that once represented the culmination of my creative efforts and experience, which I hope will encourage the creation of many different pieces. It’s easy to see that I’ve not been happy with my creative efforts for a while. The reasons for that, however, are a little harder to see, which I will attempt to explain while talking about this work in progress. It’ll also serve as a good opportunity to talk about future plans for creative content.

Most of those plans will be tied to the aforementioned reasons.

As each reason highlights an area for improvement. Something that could be done better than (or at the very least differently to) how it is done now, which will hopefully mean that there will be more creative content and that it will be more diverse. You can reasonably assume that some of the older digital paintings which have faded into obscurity will make a return, too.

Most reasons relate to not utilising time (or other resources) effectively and therefore having less overall opportunity to work on things. I’m not happy with how much progress I’ve made over the last few years, either. Not to say that the progress isn’t there- but that there is very little in the way of finished pieces to demonstrate it. I don’t want to have endless quantities of somewhat finished sketches and attempted digital paintings. I want to finish things. For that reason, it’s important to invest more actual time in the process of creating things. Which I really don’t do now and I should. I’ve very few excuses for that other than that I always find an excuse. I need to stop doing that, too. Legitimate excuses do exist (like those of the last few months) but not in all cases.

It’s taking on a rather interesting shape.

This particular work in progress highlights a continued push towards finishing something. Over a few, shorter, less intensive drawing sessions of a few hours or so. In that way I’m rather proud of this piece. It has had significantly less time invested in it than Pug Life, but, in my opinion, looks that much better with more attention to detail. I’ve mostly settled on a semi-realistic kind of stylised digital painting approach. It’s also the first digital painting I’ve done with my newly acquired Wacom Intuos Pro and so I’ve got quite a way to go yet.

But it’s a pretty good first attempt so far.

It’s painfully obvious how much I’ve improved in my approach, too. Both with digital painting and with my creative efforts as a whole. Which may seem contradictory to the above statement about my progression, but it does illustrate (no pun intended) the point I was making. The progression is there but there needs to be pieces that are actually finished to demonstrate that.

Which, obviously, this piece isn’t finished, but it’s probably the closest I’ve had to being finished for some time. I’m hoping to change around the current creative content in January and if I’m successful in doing so then things will be very different. But I hope that most will agree that they’re better this way. I’m still particularly proud of the original interpretation of this owl and it is still an important piece, but I think it’s time to move on from it. To embrace new ideas and new inspiration. To use new materials and approaches both traditionally and digitally. To boldly go where no man has gone before. Oh- wait- that wasn’t what I meant to say. It might still work in that context, though.

Have a nice weekend, all!

Moggie

Art, design, and the like found herein (unless otherwise specified) is drawn and owned by David Wilkshire (also credited as Moggie) from 2006 to present date.